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World War II - Resources at UGA Special Collections: Brown Media Archives Resources

Brown Media Archives

Home Page: www.libs.uga.edu/media

Hours: By appointment only, Monday - Friday, 8:00 AM to 5:00 PM and Saturday, 1:00 PM to 5:00 PM

Contact: Ruta Abolins, abolins@uga.edu, 706-542-4757

About: The Walter J. Brown Media Archive & Peabody Awards Collection was started in 1995 and currently preserves over 250,000 titles in film, video, audiotape, transcription disks, and other recording formats dating from the 1920s to the present. The archives are housed in the Richard B. Russell Building Special Collections Libraries on the northwest part of the University of Georgia campus. Our mission is to preserve, protect, and provide access to the moving image and sound materials that reflect the collective memory of broadcasting and the history of the state of Georgia and its people.

 

Brown Media Archives Resources

Major James Gibson served in Bainbridge, Georgia, at Bainbridge Air Force Base and in Montgomery, Alabama, at Maxwell Air Force Base during World War II. His black and white and color home movies span 1942 through 1954 and document family life in base housing, time off with several groups of friends, the interior of base offices, bomber aircraft, and a parade in Butler, Georgia.

The WSB Newsfilm Collection contains over 5 million feet of newsfilm dating from 1949 to 1981. Footage pertaining to World War II includes early newsfilm of the Allied forces landing in Normandy, the German invasion of France, the bombing of Japan, and clips from the Battle of the Bulge.

The 1946 winner citation reads: "We feel that a citation in the field of education should go to the American Broadcasting Company and to Robert Saudek, the director of public service, for its adaptation in four broadcasts of John Hersey's fateful story of Hiroshima. We give this citation with a preliminary bow to John Hersey and The New Yorker for their scoop of the year."

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