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Capturing Science Contest: 2017 Winners - Graduate

Graduate Category

Name: Megan Prescott
Year: Sixth-year PhD candidate
Program: Microbiology
Submission: Designing Science - Fashion Content

Commentary: Megan Prescott’s Designing Science playfully subverts gender stereotypes in fashion and science, stitching the two fields together in a highly original and accessible manner. Megan’s project, presented as an Instagram fashion account, not only helps communicate science to a broader public; it also personalizes science by highlighting Megan’s own work as a science researcher. Our contest judges appreciated Megan’s visual puns and witty allusions to the material conditions of science, including patterns based on fluorescent microscopic images; appliqué that mimics the texture of Mycobacterium in petri dishes; and zip-front skirts crafted from the disposable jumpsuits used at biocontainment facilities.

prescott designing science instagram profile

Name: Katlin Shae
Year: Third-year MFA student
Program: Sculpture
Submission: The Woven Quantum Image -  Art Exhibit

Commentary: Katlin Shae’s The Woven Quantum Image is an impressive series of tapestries inspired by images from the world of quantum physics, including the Higgs Boson, particle collisions, and the CERN Large Hadron Collider. Katlin explores and engages these iconic images using her own rich and coherent visual language, which both translates and transcends the original source material. Our contest judges noted how her art invokes STEM on several levels: As Katlin’s cover letter convincingly describes, weaving is itself a complex and historical process with deep connections to math, computer science, and technology. Like Megan Prescott’s Designing Science fashion line, Katlin’s art encourages STEM awareness by dissolving boundaries between disparate fields

Name: Zachery Jarrell
Year: First-year PhD student
Program: Poultry Science
Submission: A SA-Ve on Efficiency: Surface Area to Volume Ratio Explained - Animated Video Tutorial

CommentaryZachery Jarrell’s animated tutorial nimbly explains how cells come to establish their optimal size. Zachery’s animation is clever, humorous, and syncs well with the flow established by his voiceover narration. Our contest judges found this video to be well-paced and, at under 3 minutes, refreshingly brief. This concision is all the more impressive given that this is Zachery’s first attempt at animation. Zachery’s ability to simplify a complex STEM topic in a concise manner demonstrates, not unlike the cells he describes, his adept negotiation of size, form, and content. Like Sara Sturges’ video on Earth Systems, Zachery’s tutorial helps to communicate science by skillfully attending to the experience and attention span of viewers.