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Environment and Design book displays FY22: Sept 22: Natural Landscapes

About this Exhibit

Native Environment and Design at the Owens Library

Natural Landscapes

The Living Landscape

"This thoughtful, intelligent book is all about connectivity, addressing a natural world in which we are the primary influence." --The New York Times Books Review Many gardeners today want a home landscape that nourishes and fosters wildlife, but they also want beauty, a space for the kids to play, privacy, and maybe even a vegetable patch. Sure, it's a tall order, but The Living Landscape shows you how to do it. You'll learn the strategies for making and maintaining a diverse, layered landscape--one that offers beauty on many levels, provides outdoor rooms and turf areas for children and pets, incorporates fragrance and edible plants, and provides cover, shelter, and sustenance for wildlife. Richly illustrated and informed by both a keen eye for design and an understanding of how healthy ecologies work. The Living Landscape will enable you to create a garden that fulfills both human needs and the needs of wildlife communities.

Forest Plants of the Southeast and Their Wildlife Uses

This guide to common and unique plants found in forests of the Southeast thoroughly covers 330 species of forbs (herbaceous plants), grasses, vines, and shrubs, with a special emphasis on the plants' role in wildlife sustenance. Packed with detailed color photographs, the book is a must-have for forest landowners, game and wildlife managers, biologists, outdoors enthusiasts, students--anyone with an interest in the intricate and often unexpected interrelationships between the flora and fauna of our region's forests. Features:Descriptions of native and nonnative (exotic or invasive) plants, including 330 species of forbs, in 180 genera: grasses, sedges, and rushes; woody vines and semiwoody plants; shrubs; palms and yucca; cane; cactus; ferns; and ground lichen650 color photosMap of physiographic provinces56 simple black-and-white drawings of flower parts, flower types, and inflorescences, leaf arrangements, leaf divisions, shapes, and margins, and parts of a grass plantGlossaryIndex of genera by family, index by wildlife species, and index of scientific and common names

The Crosby Arboretum

Since its genesis in 1980, Crosby Arboretum in southern Mississippi has attracted international recognition for its contributions to architecture, biology, and landscape design. Now owned and operated by Mississippi State University, Crosby is the first fully realized ecologically designed arboretum in the United States and the premier native plant conservatory in the Southeast. Former site director and curator Robert F. Brzuszek provides a detailed survey of the arboretum's origins, planning, construction, and ongoing management. More than just a botanical center, Crosby emerged as one of the first American landscape projects to successfully balance natural habitat and planned design. The book's generous selection of photographs and drawings illustrate the beauty and purpose of the site's components: the award-winning Pinecote Pavilion, designed by architect Fay Jones; a 104-acre focus area that includes the Piney Woods Lake, which displays native water plants in their natural setting; and seven hundred additional acres of savanna, woodland, and aquatic environments that nurture more than 300 species of indigenous trees, shrubs, wildflowers, and grasses. Utilizing the interactions between two opposing natural forces -- fire and water -- Crosby Arboretum protects the biological diversity indigenous to the Pearl River Drainage Basin, in southern Mississippi and southeastern Louisiana. Brzuszek's inspiring and informative account will help further Crosby's role as a model of sustainable landscape design and management across the country.

The Dynamic Landscape

The last quarter of the twentieth century witnessed a burgeoning of interest in ecological or naturally-inspired use of vegetation in the designed landscape. More recently, a strong aesthetic element has been added to what was formerly a movement aimed at creating nature-like landscapes. This book advances an innovative fusion of scientific and ecological planting design philosophies which can address the need for more sustainable designed landscapes. It is a major statement on the design, implementation and management of ecologically-inspired landscape vegetation. With contributions from experts at the forefront of development in this area across Europe and North America, this work gives the reader a valuable synthesis of current thinking.

The Land Has Memory

In the heart of Washington, D.C., a centuries-old landscape has come alive in the twenty-first century through a re-creation of the natural environment as the region's original peoples might have known it. Unlike most landscapes that surround other museums on the National Mall, the natural environment around the Smithsonian's National Museum of the American Indian (NMAI) is itself a living exhibit, carefully created to reflect indigenous ways of thinking about the land and its uses. Abundantly illustrated, The Land Has Memory offers beautiful images of the museum's natural environment in every season as well as the uniquely designed building itself. Essays by Smithsonian staff and others involved in the museum's creation provide an examination of indigenous peoples' long and varied relationship to the land in the Americas, an account of the museum designers' efforts to reflect traditional knowledge in the creation of individual landscape elements, detailed descriptions of the 150 native plant species used, and an exploration of how the landscape changes seasonally. The Land Has Memory serves not only as an attractive and informative keepsake for museum visitors, but also as a thoughtful representation of how traditional indigenous ways of knowing can be put into practice.

Field Guide to the Wildflowers of Georgia and Surrounding States

Field Guide to the Wildflowers of Georgia and Surrounding States is the first field guide devoted exclusively to Georgia's wildflowers, while also including a large number of plants found in neighboring states. Botanist Linda G. Chafin has organized the scientific information in a clear, logical, and accessible way. The guide includes nontechnical species descriptions and comparisons with similar plants, information on the habitats and natural communities that support Georgia's wildflowers, and suggestions for the best places and times to see wildflowers. It also features descriptions of the wildflowers found in forests, woodlands, and wetlands, as well as those growing along roadsides that are often dismissed as ?weeds? but which may first attract the attention of budding naturalists. FEATURES: A set of 750 thumbnail photographs that allows users to identify plants by flower color Detailed descriptions for 770 of the most common wildflowers found in Georgia and throughout most of the Southeast, as well as additional information for 530 ?similar to? species Descriptions of the natural communities in Georgia where wildflowers may be easily seen An alphabetical arrangement by plant family, with each plant family broken down alphabetically by genus and species A guide to the pronunciation of scientific names Lightweight and sturdy enough for the field but inclusive enough for the reference shelf 90% or more of the species in this guide also occur in Alabama, North Carolina, and South Carolina 80% or more of the species in this guide also occur in Florida, Louisiana, Mississippi, Tennessee, and Virginia

The Southern Gardener's Book of Lists

A virtual index to gardening in the South, you can't afford to garden without this friendly anthology of personalities, experiences, and information.

The State Botanical Garden of Georgia

These 145 spectacular color photographs celebrate nature's cycles in a splendid and diverse southern garden. Each month for more than six years, Carol and Hugh Nourse have explored the paths and collections of the State Botanical Garden of Georgia in Athens, capturing the kaleidoscope of its seasons. In this large-format, beautifully produced volume, we move by season and scale from detailed close-ups to atmospheric vistas. From the subdued blues of a snow-covered garden to the dazzling golden light on scarlet leaves in autumn, the Nourses' keen and affectionate eyes have captured not only the living forms, but the essence of a garden in all its changing moods. A general introduction traces the history and development of this public garden, and brief sectional essays describe the special features of the Garden in each season. The sequence begins aptly with the glorious explosion of spring and meanders joyfully through the waxing and waning of the seasons to the stark forms of winter. An "Under Glass" section showcases tropical and sub-tropical jewels in the three-story conservatory. In the foreword, Garden director Jeff Lewis points out that the Nourses' photographs enable us to "notice details we might otherwise miss--symmetry, texture, form, color." Dedicated volunteers with the Garden's Plant Conservation Program, the Nourses champion conservation in a uniquely powerful way by simply letting the beauty of nature speak for itself. As they turn our eyes to the intricate, fragile beauty of tiny wildflowers and lacy ruffles of peeling bark, we begin to see this and all gardens with new wonder.

Essays on Nature and Landscape

Susan Fenimore Cooper (1813-1894), though often overshadowed by her celebrity father, James Fenimore Cooper, has recently become recognized as both a pioneer of American nature writing and an early advocate for ecological sustainability. Editors Rochelle Johnson and Daniel Patterson have assembled here a collection of ten pieces by Cooper that represent her most accomplished nature writing and the fullest articulation of her environmental principles. With one exception, these essays have not been available in print since their original appearance in Cooper's lifetime. A portrait of her thoughts on nature and how we should live and think in relation to it, this collection both contextualizes Cooper's magnum opus, Rural Hours (1850), and demonstrates how she perceived her work as a nature writer. Frequently her essays are models of how to catch and keep the interest of a reader when writing about plants, animals, and our relationship to the physical environment. By lamenting the decline of bird populations, original forests, and overall biodiversity, she champions preservation and invokes a collective environmental conscience that would not begin to awaken until the end of her life and century. The selections include independent essays, miscellaneous introductions and prefaces, and the first three installments from Cooper's work of literary ornithology, "Otsego Leaves," arguably her most mature and fully realized contribution to American environmental writing. In addition to a foreword by John Elder, one of the nation's leading environmental educators, an introduction analyzes each essay in various cultural contexts. Brief but handy textual notes supplement the essays. Perfect for nature-writing aficionados, environmental historians, and environmental activists, this collection will radically expand Cooper's importance to the history of American environmental thought.

Nature by Design

Biophilia is the theory that people possess an inherent affinity for nature, which developed during the long course of human evolution. In recent years, studies have revealed that this inclination continues to be a vital component to human health and wellbeing. Given the pace and scale of construction today with its adversarial, dominative relationship with nature, the integration of nature with the built environment is one of the greatest challenges of our time. In this sweeping examination, Stephen Kellert describes the basic principles, practices, and options for successfully implementing biophilic design. He shows us what is--and isn't--good biophilic design using examples of workplaces, healthcare facilities, schools, commercial centers, religious structures, and hospitality settings. This book will to appeal to architects, designers, engineers, scholars of human evolutionary biology, and--with more than one hundred striking images of designs--anyone interested in nature???inspired spaces.]]>

Landscape and Sustainability

This unique book is about landscape, sustainability and the practices of the professions which plan, design and manage landscapes at many scales and in many locations; urban, suburban and rural. Despite the ubiquity of 'sustainability' as a concept, this is the first book to address the relationship between landscape architecture and sustainability in a comprehensive way. Much in the book is underpinned by landscape ecology, in contrast to the idea of landscape as only appealing to the eye or aspiring cerebrally to be fine art. As this book argues, landscape is and must be much more than this; landscape architecture is about making places which are biologically wholesome, socially just and spiritually rewarding.

Designed Ecologies

Kongjian Yu and his office Turenscape are beyond doubt the foremost landscape architecture practice in China today. The vast scale of China and her apparently boundless growth have enabled Yu to test many ideas that are still largely theories in the Western world. His work - increasingly valued and appreciated in Europe and North America - has attained an extremely high and elegant level in both conception and execution. Kongjian Yu is known for his ecological stance, often against the resistance of local authorities. His guiding design principles are the appreciation of the ordinary and a deep embracing of nature, even in its potentially destructive aspects, such as floods. Among his most acclaimed projects are Houtan Park for Shanghai Expo, the Red Ribbon Park in Qinhuangdao, and Shipyard Park in Zhongshan.

The Native Landscape Reader

In this volume Robert E. Grese gathers together writings on nature-based landscape design and conservation by some of the country's most significant practitioners, horticulturalists, botanists, and conservationists of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Written with a strong conservation ethic, these essays often originally appeared in obscure, short-lived publications and are difficult to locate today, comprising a rich but hidden literature. Over many years of pioneering research into the work of Jens Jensen, O. C. Simonds, and other early landscape architects who advocated for the use of native plants and conservation, Grese encountered and began collecting these pieces. With this volume, he offers readers his trove. Purposely avoiding literature that is widely available, Grese shares as well his experience of discovery. His introduction provides perspective on the context of these writings and the principles they espouse, and his conclusion illuminates their relevance today with the emerging emphasis on sustainable design. This collection will appeal to general readers interested in the issues of sustainability, horticulture and gardening, and landscape design and preservation, as well as to historians, practitioners, and specialists. Published in association with Library of American Landscape History: http://lalh.org/

Field Guide to the Rare Plants of Georgia

Abundantly illustrated with more than 400 color photographs and 200 detailed drawings, this comprehensive guide to the state's rare and endangered plants provides photographs and botanical illustrations in a single volume formatted for field use. More than 200 species are covered, including two dozen that are federally listed and 170-plus that are listed as Threatened, Endangered, Rare, or of Special Concern by the Georgia Department of Natural Resources. The guide is designed for easy, nontechnical identification of species in the field. Color photographs show the plants in their natural surroundings, and drawings emphasize the most distinctive parts of the plants. Packed with information about the plants as well as their habitats and management, the guide facilitates the quick recognition of rare species, encourages awareness of their distribution and ecological significance, and provides guidelines for ensuring their survival. Additional features include directions for using the guide, a map of Georgia's counties, descriptions of the natural communities of Georgia, references for further reading, a glossary of frequently used terms, and indexes of scientific and common plant names. The guide also includes a chapter by Jennifer Ceska and University of Georgia horticulture professor James Affolter, founding members of the Georgia Plant Conservation Alliance, on horticultural requirements of rare species and the role of GPCA in their protection. This is a valuable resource for students, wildflower enthusiasts, botanists, land managers, and environmental decision makers. Each species account includes: one or more full-color photographs Georgia distribution map line drawing emphasizing such key field identification characters as leaf, stem, flower, and fruit scientific and common names legal and wetland status brief nontechnical description emphasizing key field identification characters flowering, fruiting, or sporulation period description of species habitat information on best survey season range-wide distribution Georgia conservation status management guidelines information on similar species and related rare species list of references

About the summaries

Summaries attached to these titles have been supplied by the book's publisher, and should be considered advertisements (jacket blurbs), not objective reviews.