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ENGL 4770: 20th-Century American Poetry (Rosenbaum): Annotated Bibliography Assignment

Finding Scholarly Sources

For your bibliography, you will need at least six secondary sources. Of these six, at least three should be scholarly books, and three should be articles from scholarly journals. This guide will help you locate the books and journals you need.

Books: Although most books in the library's collection are scholarly, some are not. You'll know it's a scholarly book if:

  • the book presents original research and ideas
  • the author is an expert in the field and holds an advanced degree in the subject covered or a related field and/or has published other books or articles in that area
  • the language is written for an academic audience
  • the author cites other sources with footnotes or a bibliography/works cited list and the book usually has an index
  • the publisher is a university press or other academic publisher such as Palgrave Macmillan, Routledge, Bloomsbury, etc.(ask a librarian or your professor for guidance)

Journals: A journal is a regularly-published collection of articles. Some of the library databases only include scholarly articles (JSTOR, MLA International Bibliography, Project Muse) while others have a mixture of scholarly and popular. Often, databases will let you limit your search to "scholarly" or "academic" journals. You'll know it's a scholarly article if:

  • the article presents original research and ideas
  • the author is an expert in the field and holds an advanced degree in the subject covered or a related field and/or has published other articles or books in that area
  • the language is written for an academic audience
  • the author cites other sources with footnotes or a bibliography/works cited list
  • the journal has an editorial board made up of experts; the journal may be published by an academic publisher or a scholarly society

Need guidance? Ask me!

Formatting and Managing Your References

Libraries' help sheet on MLA citation style has examples of commonly-used sources like books and articles. 

Purdue OWL and the MLA Quick Guide have more details on using MLA style. The full manual is at the Main Library Reference Desk; ask at the desk or give us a call with questions: 706-542-3251.

 Many databases have a citation tool embedded in them -- when looking at an article or book, look for links saying "Cite" or "Cite this item." These are machine-generated, so be sure to review them for accuracy.

If you are writing a larger research paper or thesis, you may want to use a citation management program. Citation management programs help you keep track of what you find as well as format your references in a wide variety of styles including MLA.

  • Zotero is free to download and use
  • RefWorks is free for UGA students, and you can continue to use it after graduation.  You can export references from GIL-Find and most other databases directly into RefWorks. Set up an appointment to learn more..

Your Librarian

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Kristin Nielsen
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Contact:
Main Library Research & Instruction Department
knielsen@uga.edu
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