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FYOS 1001: Engaging Athens: A College Student's guide to the Historical and Contemporary Politics of Athens, GA (Rice): Home

GALILEO Login

To use our GALILEO databases, e-journals, and e-books from off-campus and some UGA wireless networks, you'll be prompted to log in with your MyID and password. Your MyID is your UGAMail address minus the "@uga.edu."

Forgot your MyID and/or password?


Don't have a UGA MyID? Visit or contact Access Services to find out if you are eligible to have a library account created for you:

phone: 706.542.3256

email: maincirc@uga.edu

Search Strategy Builder

SSB created by University of Arizona Libraries and located at GitHub

Citation Management

JSTOR

JSTOR is a full-text collection of core scholarly journals in almost all subjects. JSTOR does not include articles from the past few years. Use the search box below or go to the JSTOR homepage.

Multi-Search

Video, Audio & Images

Historical Maps & Air Photos

Primary Research Articles

Are all the articles in a scholarly journal primary research articles?

No. Journals also publish other items. Some article types are listed below. While these articles can be very important and reputable, they cannot be considered primary research. If you have access to our databases (on-campus or off-campus with your MyID), click for examples.

  • Information/Opinion Essay: Gives advice and information, usually targeted to practicioners -- doctors, teachers, counselors, etc. These essays are sometimes in first person. - example
  • Book review/essay: Much longer than popular books reviews, academic books reviews often compare and analyze similar works, and contain a detailed bibliography -- example
  • Literature review: A lit review surveys research done in a field, drawing conclusions and anticipating trends, but without detailed methodology information or data on any one research project -- example
  • Reader Letters/Response Articles/Errata: Responses to articles published in a previous issue. These may be informal letters, or they may be very structured debates that cite other literature. There may be cases in which someone reports an error or corrects misprints of data. A letter may also describe recent research, but the content has not gone through the peer review process -- example
How can I identify a primary research article?
It should have the following parts:
  • Title - These are often long and technical.
  • Author Information - This includes author name, affiliation (such as a university or laboratory) and contact information.
  • Citation - Citations include article title, journal or source name, volume and issue information and pagination.  A DOI number may be on the first page of a journal, but it may be easier to find the DOI on the database record. (DOIs are used in APA style citation)
  • Abstract - This is a summary of the whole article. 
  • Introduction - This outlines the problem being examined -- the purpose or hypothesis -- and may give some background about the problem, or previous research.
  • Methodology - This is a vital section.  In order for an experiment to be reproduceable, methodology must be thoroughly described.  This may include discussion of materials and subject selection.
  • Data/Results - Data may be presented in tables, charts, figures, or illustrations.
  • Discussion/Conclusions -This section explains and interprets the results, drawing a final conclusion about the problem.  Primary research may bring new information to the discipline, or may confirm or dispute previous findings.
  • References - Are in a consistent style, and are extensive.

About the Libraries

Main Library

The UGA Libraries include the Main Library on North Campus, the McBay Science Library on South Campus, the Miller Learning Center in central campus, and the Russell Special Collections Building near North Campus as well as smaller libraries in the College of Education, School of Music, School of Art, Health Sciences Campus Carnegie Library, and College of Veterinary Medicine.

See the UGA Libraries website for hours.

If you're looking for quiet study space: The upper floors of both the Main Library and the McBay Science Library are good spots for quiet study, particularly the 3rd floor Reading Room in Main and the 4th floor silent Think Tank in McBay. The top floor of the Miller Learning Center is set aside for quiet study.

If you're looking for group study space: The Miller Learning Center has 90 group study rooms, and the Main Library has 30 small group study rooms, all first come, first served. Half of the Main Library's 4th floor is dedicated to group study, with whiteboard paint on most of the walls and moveable tables and chairs.