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LLED 5040: Early Childhood Education (Feng): Some Databases to Search

Some Useful Databases

Here is a list of SOME of the databases to which we have access and which might be of use to you. To access these databases through the Libraries' Homepage, use the Articles & Databases Tab and search "Databases by Name".

In addition to looking at the major Education & Psychology databases,  ERIC, Education Research Complete & APA PsycInfo, consider your other options. Remember that you can search multiple databases simultaneously within database "families" (EBSCO & ProQuest).

When you're in the EBSCO Databases, click on the "choose databases" link by the search box for access to many more databases. We have ebooks for the k-12 crowd and you can access them from the list, Just click and say "okay" and you're on your way.

Children’s Literature Comprehensive Database (CLCD) is the most comprehensive source for PreK-12 and young adult reading materials. A useful way to find children's books dealing with their mental health issues & questions.

We are also fortunate to have access to Education Database (ProQuest), and two education-orientened newspapers, Education Week  (daily) and The Chronicle of Higher Education.  You should consider making reading Education Week part of your daily routine. The most recent month of the Chronicle is not available online.

Education Database (ProQuest). Gives users access to over 900 top educational publications, including more than 600 of the titles in full text. The coverage spans the literature on primary, secondary and higher education as well as special education, home schooling and adult education, from 1988 to the present.

Search Tips

Databases in the EBSCO "family" can be searched simultaneously by clicking on the "choose databases" link above the search box. Select the additional databases you need and click "ok" to search more than one database at a time. When you do this, leave the search option "Select a field" as it is, rather than trying to identify multiple subjects.

ProQuest also has a "family" and the same tips apply to searching there.

Some search tips: The "select a field" option looks at the title, abstract, subject headings & full-text if available. It's a broad kind of search.

  • Use quotation marks to keep your phrases as phrases: "autism spectrum"
  • Use the asterisk * to expand your search. Type the root of your word~teach~ and add the asterisk~teach* to retrieve teach, teacher, teachers, teaching
  • Keep your synonyms in the same box and join by or. These would be terms that are interchangeable in your search. You'll get more hits this way.
  • Don't type complete sentences but use just the main concepts.
  • Narrow your results to "peer reviewed" to get scholarly materials.
  • Use the blue "find it @ UGA" button to see what kinds of access we have for that article. If it's not available electronically, scroll down to find the link "We may own this item in print" and select the GIL Classic link to if we own this item.
  • If we don't have it in print nor electronically, call on Interlibrary Loan.  They will track down the articles (and books) that we don't have. For free. Articles will come to you as a link in your email to a pdf of the document. Always check to be certain that we don't have access before submitting your request.